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About Me

While this blog was initially about my adventures in growing my own food, it has morphed into a window into my search for the truth and justice I was raised to revere. Also, be warned that while I strive to be open-minded and open-hearted, I can have some very strong opinions on certain subjects.

Blogs I follow:

Theme by: Miguel
  1. A Different Perspective on Human Rights in the U.S.

    #whyioccupy Noteworthy excerpts, ALL backed up with sources and figures (Wanna know why Occupy couldn’t come up with a single demand? Here’s a glimpse!):

    "The United States has mighty strength in human, financial and material resources to exerteffective control over violent crimes. However, its society is chronically suffering from violent crimes, and its citizens’ lives, properties and personal security are in lack of proper protection"

    "The US government has significantly cut the expense on education, reduced teaching staff,and shortened school hours with tuition fees soaring. The guarantee for teenagers’ rights toeducation is weakening."

    "In the United States, the violation of citizens’ civil and political rights is severe. It is lying to itselfwhen the United States calls itself the land of the free (The Washington Post, Jan 14, 2012)."

    "Whatever the deep reasons for the movement are, the single fact that thousands of protesterswere treated in a rude and violent way, with many of them being arrested - the act of willfullytrampling on people’ s freedom of assembly, demonstration and speech - could provide aglimpse to the truth of the so-called US freedom and democracy."

    "While advocating press freedom, the United States in fact imposes fairly strict censoring andcontrol over the press and "press freedom" is just a political tool used to beautify itself andattack other nations."

    "The US Patriot Act and Homeland Security Act both have clauses about monitoring the Internet,giving the government or law enforcement organizations power to monitor and block anyInternet content "harmful to national security." Protecting Cyberspace as a National Asset Act of2010 stipulates that the federal government has "absolute power" to shut down the Internetunder a declared national emergency. According to a report by British newspaper the Guardiandated Mar 17, 2011, the US military is developing software that will let it secretly manipulatesocial media sites by using fake online personas, and will allow the US military to create a falseconsensus in online conversations, crowd out unwelcome opinions and smother commentariesor reports that do not correspond with its own objectives. The project aims to control andrestrict free speech on the Internet (The Guardian, Mar 17, 2011)."

    "The US democracy is increasingly being influenced by capitalization and becoming a system for"master of money." Data issued by the US Center for Responsive Politics in November 2011show that 46 percent of the US federal senators and members of the House of Representativeshave personal assets of more than a million dollars. That well explains why US administration’ splans to impose higher tax on the rich who earn more than one million dollars annually havebeen blocked in the Congress (www.finance-ol.com). As a commentary put it, money hasemerged as the electoral trump card in the US political system, and corporations have a Supreme Court-recognized right to use their considerable financial muscle to promotecandidates and policies favorable to their business operations and to resist policies and shutout candidates deemed inimical to their business interests (Online edition of Time, Jan 20, 2011)”

    "The US lacks basic due lawsuit process protections, and its government continues to claim theright to strip citizens of legal protections based on its sole discretion (The Washington Post, Jan14, 2012). The National Defense Authorization Act, signed Dec 31, 2011, allows for theindefinite detention of citizens (The Washington Post, Jan 14, 2012). The Act will placedomestic terror investigations and interrogations into the hands of the military and which wouldopen the door for trial-free, indefinite detention of anyone, including American citizens, so longas the government calls them terrorists (www.forbes.com, Dec 5, 2011).”

    "The US remains the country with the largest "prison population" and the highest per capita levelof imprisonment in the world, and the detention centers’ conditions are terrible. According tothe US Department of Justice, the number of prisoners amounted to 2.3 million in 2009 and onein every 132 American citizens is behind bars."

    "The United States is the world’s richest country, but quite a lot of Americans still lack guaranteefor their economic, social and cultural rights, which are necessary for personal dignity and self-development.

    The United States has not done enough to protect its citizens from unemployment. At no time inthe last 60 years had the country’s long-term unemployment been so high for so long as it wasin 2011. It has been one of the Western developed countries that provide the poorestprotection of laborer’s rights. It has not approved any international labor organizationconvention in the last 10 years. Moreover, the US lacks an effective arbitration system to dealwith enterprises that refuse to compromise with employees.”

    "Over the past five years, thepercentage of singles arriving at shelters after living with family or elsewhere in the communityhas jumped from 39 percent to 66 percent (The USA Today, Dec 9, 2011)."

    "The US declared it has the best healthcare service in the world, but quite a lot of Americanscould not enjoy due medication and healthcare. The Cable News Network reported on Sept 13, 2011, that the number of people who lacked health insurance in 2010 climbed to 49.9 million(Cable News Network, Sept 13, 2011). Bloomberg reported on March 16, 2011, that 9 million Americans have lost health insurance during the past two years.

    "Ethnic minorities in the United States have long been suffering systemic, widespread and institutional discrimination. And racial discrimination has become an indelible characteristic and symbol of American values."

    "To date, the US has ratified neither the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women, nor the Convention on the Rights of the Child. As the US neglects the rights of women and children, their situation deteriorates."

    "The US has been pursuing hegemony in the world, grossly trampling upon the sovereignty of other countries and capriciously violating human rights against other nations."

    "The US-led wars, albeit alleged to be "humanitarian intervention" efforts and for "the rise of a new democratic nation", created humanitarian disasters instead."

    "The above-mentioned facts are but a small yet illustrative enough fraction of the US’ dismal record on its human rights situation. The US’ own tarnished human rights record has made it in no condition, on a moral, political or legal basis, to act as the world’s "human rights justice," to place itself above other countries and release the Country Reports on Human Rights Practices year after year to accuse and blame other countries. We hereby advise the US government once again to look squarely at its own grave human rights problems, to stop the unpopular practices of taking human rights as a political instrument for interference in other countries’ internal affairs, smearing other nations’ images and seeking its own strategic interests, and to cease using double standards on human rights and pursuing hegemony under the pretext of human rights."

  2. Moonpie was taken: askbryan: underpaidgenius: climateadaptation: I can’t help but reblog...

    askbryan:

    underpaidgenius:

    climateadaptation:

    I can’t help but reblog this HUGE win for Americans: it’s not a crime to film police. Please reblog!!

    Photography Is Not A Crime of the Day: Simon Glik, a Boston lawyer who sued the city and several police officers for arresting him and seizing his phone while he was recording a violent drug arrest on the Boston Common, succeeded in convincing the Court of Appeals for the First Circuit that his first and fourth amendment rights had been violated.

    The Police Department attempted to claim “qualified immunity” — a doctrine that “protects government officials from lawsuits alleging that they violated plaintiffs’ rights” except in cases where a “clearly established” statutory or constitutional right has been violated — on grounds that Glik was arrested for “illegal wiretapping” (conducting an audio recording “without the consent of both parties”).

    The court ruled that Glik’s lawsuit is allowed to stand because “firmly established” rights were violated when his phone was seized. From the ruling [PDF]: “Gathering information about government officials in a form that can readily be disseminated to others serves a cardinal First Amendment interest in protecting and promoting ‘the free discussion of governmental affairs’.”

    The court went on to say that “changes in technology and society have made the lines between private citizen and journalist exceedingly difficult to draw,” and therefore First Amendment protections for news-gatherers can no longer “turn on professional credentials or status.”

    [universalhub / slashdot / video: aclu.]

    Finally the courts are moving against the police tactic of claiming citizens filming their actions in public are somehow guilty of the crime of wire-tapping. Yes, that’s how they have charged people like Glik.


    (Source: thedailywhat)

  3. 427 Notes
    Reblogged: skyghe