There is no True Reality


While this blog was initially about my adventures in growing my own food, it morphed into a window into my search for the truth and justice I was raised to revere, and has become my place to rediscover my Self. Be warned that while I strive to be open-minded and open-hearted, I can have some very strong opinions on certain subjects.

What Is Love?  About Me (outside the garden)  My Wedding Ring  Permaculture Info, Articles, etc.  Why Commit to Growing My Own Food?  Why YOU should care about GMOs  Companion Planting Sites and Info  Other Useful Gardening Links and Info  My Permagarden  Edible Perennials  2011 Garden Results  2011 Garden Plans  Year One: 2010  

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neurosciencestuff:

New Research on Walnuts and the Fight Against Alzheimer’s Disease
A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer’s disease.
Research led by Abha Chauhan, PhD, head of the Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory at the New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities (IBR), found significant improvement in learning skills, memory, reducing anxiety, and motor development in mice fed a walnut-enriched diet.
The researchers suggest that the high antioxidant content of walnuts (3.7 mmol/ounce) may have been a contributing factor in protecting the mouse brain from the degeneration typically seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Oxidative stress and inflammation are prominent features in this disease, which affects more than five million Americans.
“These findings are very promising and help lay the groundwork for future human studies on walnuts and Alzheimer’s disease – a disease for which there is no known cure,” said lead researcher Dr. Abha Chauhan, PhD. “Our study adds to the growing body of research that demonstrates the protective effects of walnuts on cognitive functioning.”
The research group examined the effects of dietary supplementation on mice with 6 percent or 9 percent walnuts, which are equivalent to 1 ounce and 1.5 ounces per day, respectively, of walnuts in humans. This research stemmed from a previous cell culture study led by Dr. Chauhan that highlighted the protective effects of walnut extract against the oxidative damage caused by amyloid beta protein. This protein is the major component of amyloid plaques that form in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease.
Someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease every 67 seconds, and the number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are expected to rapidly escalate in coming years as the baby boom generation ages. By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease may nearly triple, from five million to as many as 16 million, emphasizing the importance of determining ways to prevent, slow or stop the disease. Estimated total payments in 2014 for all individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are $214 billion.
Walnuts have other nutritional benefits as they contain numerous vitamins and minerals and are the only nut that contains a significant source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) (2.5 grams per ounce), an omega-3 fatty acid with heart and brain-health benefits. The researchers also suggest that ALA may have played a role in improving the behavioral symptoms seen in the study.

neurosciencestuff:

New Research on Walnuts and the Fight Against Alzheimer’s Disease

A new animal study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease indicates that a diet including walnuts may have a beneficial effect in reducing the risk, delaying the onset, slowing the progression of, or preventing Alzheimer’s disease.

Research led by Abha Chauhan, PhD, head of the Developmental Neuroscience Laboratory at the New York State Institute for Basic Research in Developmental Disabilities (IBR), found significant improvement in learning skills, memory, reducing anxiety, and motor development in mice fed a walnut-enriched diet.

The researchers suggest that the high antioxidant content of walnuts (3.7 mmol/ounce) may have been a contributing factor in protecting the mouse brain from the degeneration typically seen in Alzheimer’s disease. Oxidative stress and inflammation are prominent features in this disease, which affects more than five million Americans.

“These findings are very promising and help lay the groundwork for future human studies on walnuts and Alzheimer’s disease – a disease for which there is no known cure,” said lead researcher Dr. Abha Chauhan, PhD. “Our study adds to the growing body of research that demonstrates the protective effects of walnuts on cognitive functioning.”

The research group examined the effects of dietary supplementation on mice with 6 percent or 9 percent walnuts, which are equivalent to 1 ounce and 1.5 ounces per day, respectively, of walnuts in humans. This research stemmed from a previous cell culture study led by Dr. Chauhan that highlighted the protective effects of walnut extract against the oxidative damage caused by amyloid beta protein. This protein is the major component of amyloid plaques that form in the brains of those with Alzheimer’s disease.

Someone in the United States develops Alzheimer’s disease every 67 seconds, and the number of Americans with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are expected to rapidly escalate in coming years as the baby boom generation ages. By 2050, the number of people age 65 and older with Alzheimer’s disease may nearly triple, from five million to as many as 16 million, emphasizing the importance of determining ways to prevent, slow or stop the disease. Estimated total payments in 2014 for all individuals with Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias are $214 billion.

Walnuts have other nutritional benefits as they contain numerous vitamins and minerals and are the only nut that contains a significant source of alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) (2.5 grams per ounce), an omega-3 fatty acid with heart and brain-health benefits. The researchers also suggest that ALA may have played a role in improving the behavioral symptoms seen in the study.

Compassion and kindness towards oneself are intrinsically woven into mindfulness.
— Jon Kabat-Zinn (via thecalminside)
nevermindtheb0ll0cks:

preach that truth

nevermindtheb0ll0cks:

preach that truth

Bill Hicks, Revelations (1993)

Source: real-hiphophead

Anonymous said: why do I Fall Asleep When I Meditate?

thecalminside:

I know if you are tired you can easily fall asleep. Meditation can relax you to the point of sleeping too. Try not to meditate when you are tired. I seem to get the most out of it in the morning before really starting my day. Try different times of day and see if that can help you stay awake, maybe try for less time as well or quitting when you feel sleep coming on.

~greg

In the meditation classes I took years ago, they emphasized posture. They said meditating with our heads lowered was more relaxing, while meditating with our heads raised was more activating.

punkandroid:

sosungalittleclodofclay:

draumbouy:

hustlinontheflow:

tastefullyoffensive:

Crazy Ideas That Just Need to Happen Already [via]

Previously: Mind-Boggling Shower Thoughts

Well, our office’s elevator actually has an option where if you press the wrong floor, you press it twice to cancel.

….you can’t mute a microwave.

draumbouy, mute the alarm, silly.

Why would you want to mute the alarm on your microwave
How would you know when your foods ready
How
Why

Yes, please! To all of these thing! Also? I see someone has never tried to use a microwave without waking people up.

Source: tastefullyoffensive

radicalmayhem:

Historian and Feminist Scholar Gerda Lerner

Queen

Source: exgynocraticgrrl

When your ideas about yourself change, so do your experiences.
— Seth (via loveinspireuniversally)

Source: loveinspireuniversally

cosmicspread:

my ultimate goal is to be at peace with myself, eliminate toxic feelings and elements and energies from my life, unlearn negative and harmful practices and thought patterns, stop checking for people that don’t check for me, create a space for myself that is nurturing for growth so that i may generate loving energy for myself and for others, nourish my spirit and balance my energies, i have big dreams and i deserve to live a life i love and let that love radiate

Source: llleighsmith

Dance, when you’re broken open. Dance, if you’ve torn the bandage off. Dance in the middle of the fighting. Dance in your blood.
Dance when you’re perfectly free.
— Rumi (via thecalminside)